Interdisciplinary Journal of Research on ReligionInstitute for Studies of Relgion
IJRR :: 2015 Volume 11 :: Article 7
2015 Volume 11, Article 7
Negative Religious Coping and Emotional Distress Among College Students: Exploring the Influences of Religiousness, Fading Affect, and Neuroticism

Author: Sherman A. Lee, Jeffrey A. Gibbons, and Andrew Hartzler (Christopher Newport University) and Jennifer K. Hartzler (Radford University)

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ABSTRACT

A growing body of research has documented the influence of negative religious coping on indicators of emotional distress. To extend this line of research, we examined whether neuroticism, fading affect, and religiousness could influence the relationship between negative religious coping and two forms of emotional distress (depressed mood and negative affective state) in a sample of 116 college students. Results of this exploratory study indicated that neuroticism did not act as a confounding variable for the relationship between negative religious coping and emotional distress. However, fading affect emerged as a partial mediator, while religiosity was found to be a moderating variable in the relationship between negative religious coping and emotional distress. Differences were also found between religious and nonreligious life events.

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